Undergraduate Program Frequently Asked Questions

Important Contacts:
  
 •     Director of Undergraduate Studies
    ◦     Shara Bailey
    ◦     Email: sbailey@nyu.edu
    ◦     Phone: 212-998-3751
  
 •     Undergraduate Administrative Aide
    ◦     Samuel Rolfe
    ◦     Email: samuel.rolfe@nyu.edu
    ◦     Phone: 212-998-8588

General Questions:

1. Where is the Department located?

2. What are the requirements for the major in Anthropology?

3. What are the requirements for the minor in Anthropology?

4. How do I declare a major or minor in Anthropology?

5. Who is my advisor in the Department of Anthropology? When should I come to see my Departmental advisor and when should I see my CAS advisor?

6. What can I do with a degree in Anthropology?

Coursework Questions:

7. How can I tell if a course is considered an introductory-level class, a mid-level class, or an upper-division class?

8. What is a “Topical Seminar”?

9 .I want to take a course with the Pass/Fail grading option. Can I count it towards my major or minor in Anthropology?

10. I’m really interested in a graduate course being offered in the Department. Are undergraduates eligible to take graduate classes?

11. What is the lowest grade I can get in a class to have it count it towards my major or minor in Anthropology?

12. I’m taking a course that is cross-listed between Anthropology and another Department. Will the class still count towards my Anthropology major or minor?

13, I’m registered for a course that is cross-listed between Anthropology and another department that I am also majoring or minoring in. Can the course “double-count” towards both degrees?

14. Are there any CCC courses that will count towards the Anthropology major or minor? What about Freshman Honors Seminars, Advanced/Collegiate Honors Seminars, or courses in the Collegiate Seminar Program? Do Anthropology courses satisfy particular CCC
requirements?  


15. I transferred into CAS from the Liberal Studies Program. Can any of my LSP classes be applied towards my major?

16. Can an Anthropology course taken at another university be applied towards my major or minor?

17. I am a transfer student. Will the Anthropology classes I took at my previous college count towards the major or minor?

18. Can I count AP credit towards my major?

19. Can I count a class I take abroad on a NYU program be applied towards my major? What courses from what abroad sites can count?

20. Can classes I take abroad at a non-NYU program be applied towards my major?

21. I checked my Degree Progress on ALBERT, and it says that I still need to take a course that I know I’ve already taken or a course that I have been told will count towards an Anthropology degree is not listed properly. What can I do?

22. What is an Independent Study? What does an Independent Study in Anthropology involve and how do I register for one? Can I count an Independent Study towards my major or minor?

23. What is an Internship? What type of Internships can I get Anthropology credit for? How do I apply? Can I count an Internship towards my major or minor?

24. How do I find out about Internship options and opportunities?

25. I'd like to participate in a summer field school. Does the department run any field schools? Can I get credit for participating in a field school?

26. How do I find out more about field study programs and opportunities?

Honors Questions:

27. I am interested in pursuing Departmental Honors in Anthropology. What are the requirements of the Honors Program?

28. How and when do I apply for admission to the Departmental Honors Program in Anthropology?

29. When are Honors theses due? How long are Honors theses? Are there any special formatting requirements?

30. What do I need to turn in to fulfill the thesis requirement of the Honors program?

31. Are there any other requirements for dissemination of my research results?

32. I am completing a double or dual major and would like to do Honors. What does that entail?

Registration Questions:

33. How do I get cleared for registration?

34. I’m studying abroad next semester. Do I still need to meet with an advisor for pre-registration advising?

35. If I am currently abroad, how do I get cleared for registration?

36. I’m a double major. Do I need to be cleared through both departments?




General Questions:


1. Where is the Department located?

The main office for the Department of Anthropology is located on the first floor of Rufus Smith Hall, at 25 Waverly Place, on the NW corner of Waverly Place and Greene Street, one block east of the NE corner of Washington Square Park.


2. What are the requirements for the major in Anthropology?


The major in anthropology consists of 36 points (typically nine 4-point courses), which include four required classes Human Society and Culture (ANTH-UA 1), Human Evolution (ANTH-UA 2), Archaeology: Early Societies and Cultures (ANTH-UA 3), and Anthropology of Language (ANTH-UA 17). The remaining elective courses may be selected from any subfield of anthropology. Students must take at least five courses from the Department of Anthropology at New York University in order to receive a major in anthropology from NYU, and a grade of at least C is required in every course to be counted toward the major. Students are not required to focus on any one of the subfields of anthropology represented in the department, but rather are free to choose elective courses that accommodate their interests as narrowly or broadly as they see fit, in consultation with the Director of Undergraduate Studies.

The Anthropology Department offers courses on a wide variety of topics, but within social anthropology and linguistics, the courses can be grouped into a few areas of concentration. These provide informal tracks that a student can use to develop expertise in a particular part of social and linguistic anthropology. The courses in each thematic area complement each other, allowing students to study similar topics from a variety of perspectives and develop a more coherent understanding of the field.
  1. Culture, Symbols, and Representation: Media, Art, Language, Heritage, and Symbolic Systems
  2. Politics and Society: Politics, Law, Race, Gender, Sexuality, Violence, Economy and the State
  3. Science and Medicine: Medical Anthropology, Global Health, and Science Studies
  4. Religion, Secularism, and the Body
  5. Cultures of the World: Ethnographic Studies of World Regions

3. What are the requirements for the minor in Anthropology?


The minor in anthropology consists of 16 points (any four 4-point courses) in the Department. The foundational courses [Human Society and Culture (ANTH-UA 1), Human Evolution (ANTH-UA 2), and Archaeology: Early Societies and Cultures (ANTH-UA 3)] are recommended as overviews of the discipline and as prerequisites for more advanced courses. Minors should consult with the Director of Undergraduate Studies to design a program that best accommodates their interests. A grade of at least C is required in every course to be counted toward the minor. Students must take at least two courses from the Department of Anthropology at New York University in order to receive a minor in anthropology from NYU.


4. How do I declare a major or minor in Anthropology?

Students in the College of Arts and Sciences can declare a major or minor in Anthropology by visiting the Department office located on the ground floor of 25 Waverly Place, and speaking to the Undergraduate Administrative Aide, who can go into the Albert system and declare the major or minor.


5. Who is my advisor in the Department of Anthropology? When should I come to see my Departmental advisor and when should I see my CAS advisor?

The departmental advisor to all Anthropology majors and minors is the Director of Undergraduate Studies, who holds regular office hours and is available to answer any questions about the major or minor that are not answered on this website. Routine advising questions about the major or minor and about logistical issues can also be directed to the Department’s Undergraduate Administrative Aide. Contact information for both the Director of Undergraduate Studies and the Department’s Undergraduate Administrative Aide are given above.

Questions about other College of Arts and Sciences courses and requirements, CCC requirements and progress, and special issues (e.g., study abroad, inter-school minors, etc) are best directed to staff of the CAS Advising Center, located on the 9th floor of the Silver Building.

All Anthropology majors should come to see the Director of Undergraduate Studies at least once per semester in the weeks prior to registering for classes the following semester in order to review progress towards the degree and to be cleared for registration.


6. What can I do with a degree in Anthropology?


One of the great things about anthropology is the diversity of career paths and possibilities for future graduate and professional study it can open.

The following links offer some helpful perspectives on possible career and academic paths open to anthropologists


What Can I Do With a Major in Anthropology?

www.cas.sc.edu/anth/whatcan.html
Page from the website of the University of South Carolina Department of Anthropology with a list of possible career directions for anthropologists.


What You Can Do With a Degree in Anthropology?

www.aaanet.org/resources/students/Anthrodegree.cfm
Page from the website of the American Anthropological Association, the discipline's lead professional association. Contains links to additional sources of career information for anthropologists.


What sort of job can I get with an Anthropology degree?

www.allsands.com/college/anthropologydeg_vgn_gn.htm
Page from the AllSands website that provides a general overview of the different sub-fields of anthropology and common career paths available to practitioners of those sub-fields.


Coursework Questions:


7. How can I tell if a course is considered an introductory-level class, a mid-level class, or an upper-division class?

Introductory-level classes in the department consist of the four foundational courses required for the major – Human Society and Culture (ANTH-UA 1), Human Evolution (ANTH-UA 2), Archaeology: Early Societies and Cultures (ANTH-UA 3), and Anthropology of Language (ANTH-UA 17) – as well as a few other courses that do not have any of these four classes as prerequisites (e.g., Introduction to Forensic Anthropology, ANTH-UA 326). These are typically large-enrollment courses (80 to 160 students) taught in lecture format, often with an associated lab or recitation section.

Mid-level classes are more specialized classes and generally require one of the four foundational courses as a prerequisite. They typically have an enrollment of around 20 to 40 students, are taught in lecture or combined lecture/seminar format, and are often writing-intensive.

Upper-division classes, including “Topical Seminars” (see below), are typically small enrollment courses (10 to 20 students), servicing primarily junior and senior majors in the Department. They are reading- and writing-intensive classes, are most commonly taught in seminar format, and explore a subject in much greater depth and detail than introductory- and mid-level classes.


8. What is a “Topical Seminar”?


The prefix “Topical Seminars” is used to refer to either a new course that does not yet have a permanent course number established for it (e.g., for an experimental course currently under development) or to a course offered on an irregular schedule where the instructor, specific subject matter, and/or materials used vary from year to year.


9. I want to take a course with the Pass/Fail grading option. Can I count it towards my major or minor in Anthropology?


No. Pass/Fail courses may NOT be counted towards either the major or minor in Anthropology.


10. I’m really interested in a graduate course being offered in the Department. Are undergraduates eligible to take graduate classes?


Several of our graduate courses are open to senior- and sometimes junior-year undergraduates who have appropriate prior experience and training. Such courses are generally listed in the materials we disseminate to students in pre-registration advising period for the upcoming semester. If you are interested in enrolling in a graduate course, you should contact the instructor of the course to request permission. The instructor will need to provide email or written confirmation that their permission has been given to the Director of Undergraduate Studies, who will then enroll you in the course at the appropriate time. You will not be able to enroll yourself in any graduate courses through the ALBERT system.


11. What is the lowest grade I can get in a class to have it count it towards my major or minor in Anthropology?


In order to count a course towards the major or minor in Anthropology, you need to receive a minimum grade of C.


12. I’m taking a course that is cross-listed between Anthropology and another Department. Will the class still count towards my Anthropology major or minor?


Yes, although sometimes the course will not show up under your Anthropology major or minor when you request a Degree Progress Report in ALBERT. If this is the case, please contact the undergraduate administrative aide and they can submit a memo to the Registrar to correct the issue.


13. I’m registered for a course that is cross-listed between Anthropology and another department that I am also majoring or minoring in. Can the course “double-count” towards both degrees?


Department of Anthropology policy is that students may “double-count” up to two courses used to satisfy the Anthropology major towards another major or minor and up to one class used to satisfy the Anthropology minor towards another major or minor. However, you MUST double-check with the other department to ensure that they have a compatible policy regarding whether they will also allow such “double-counting”. The Department of Anthropology will allow up to three courses used to satisfy CCC requirements to also count towards the Anthropology major (e.g., Human Society and Culture, Human Evolution, and a Cultures in Context course taught by a full time Anthropology faculty member). Up to two course used to satisfy CCC requirements can also be applied to the minor in Anthropology.


14. Are there any CCC courses that will count towards the Anthropology major or minor? What about Freshman Honors Seminars, Advanced/Collegiate Honors Seminars, or courses in the Collegiate Seminar Program? Do Anthropology courses satisfy particular CCC requirements?


Several foundational courses required for the major can be used to fulfill College of Arts and Sciences CCC requirements: both Human Societies and Culture (ANTH-UA 1) and Archaeology: Early Societies and Cultures (ANTH-UA 3) can be used to satisfy the CCC Foundations of Contemporary Culture requirement, and Human Evolution (ANTH-UA 2) can be used to satisfy the CCC Natural Sciences II requirement. Similarly, certain CCC courses and Advanced/Collegiate Honors Seminars taken with a professor from the Department of Anthropology may be counted towards the Anthropology major or minor. For example, any CCC Cultures in Context (formerly World Cultures) courses taught by a full-time faculty member of the Department of Anthropology can be applied to either the major or minor as an elective course.


15. I transferred into CAS from the Liberal Studies Program. Can any of my LSP classes be applied towards my major?


No. The Social Foundations courses taken within LSP are not applicable to the major or minor in Anthropology.


16. Can an Anthropology course taken at another university be applied towards my major or minor?


If the College of Arts and Sciences accepts transfer of credits for an Anthropology course taken at another University, it is then possible to petition the NYU Department of Anthropology to have those credits count towards an NYU Anthropology degree. You may petition to have up to the equivalent of two courses (8 units) applied towards the major or the equivalent of up to two courses (8 units) applied toward the minor. To do so, you must present the Director of Undergraduate Studies with a copy of the syllabus and reading list for the course. The Department’s Undergraduate Curriculum Committee will then review the course and decide if it is appropriate to count towards the major or minor. At least five of your nine Anthropology classes must be taken within the NYU Department of Anthropology.


17. I am a transfer student. Will the Anthropology classes I took at my previous college count towards the major or minor?


As outlined above, if the College of Arts and Sciences accepts transfer of credits for Anthropology courses taken at another University, it is then possible to petition the NYU Department of Anthropology to have those credits count towards an NYU Anthropology degree, subject to the same limitations noted above.


18. Can I count AP credit towards my major?


No.


19. Can I count a class I take abroad on a NYU program be applied towards my major? What courses from what abroad sites can count?


Yes. If the class was offered under an Anthropology (ANTH-UA) course number or if it is cross-listed with Anthropology, it will count towards your major or minor just as if it were taken in New York. Additionally, at some sites particular classes that do not have Anthropology course numbers can nonetheless be counted towards the major or minor, assuming that they have been accepted by CAS for credit, by following the petition procedure outlined above. Below is a partial list of courses often offered at NYU Abroad sites that can be counted towards the major or minor in Anthropology: Anthropology of Indigenous Art (Sydney), Anthropology and the Arab World (Abu Dhabi), and Cultural and Social Anthropology of Spain and Iberoamerica (Madrid). Note that not all of these courses are offered during any given semester.


20. Can classes I take abroad at a non-NYU program be applied towards my major?


In some circumstances, classes taken abroad through programs not run by NYU may be applied towards the major. Students interested in pursuing this should first meet with an advisor in the College Advising Center to go over the program materials to see if the program meets College of Arts and Science standard for credits to transfer easily. Then, the CAS advisor will typically send a student to meet with the Director of Undergraduate Studies in Anthropology to see if a proposed class or course of study is appropriate to apply towards the major.

At this point, the student needs to provide the Director of Undergraduate Studies with detailed materials about the program's curricular content, including a complete syllabus and reading list (a simple course title and/or description is not sufficient). These materials will then be reviewed by appropriate faculty members within the department and the department's Undergraduate Curriculum Committee to see if it is acceptable to count toward the major or minor.

In order for the Department to consider credit for non-NYU Abroad programs, students should begin consulting with both the College of Arts and Sciences Advising Center and with the Director of Undergraduate Studies well in advance of the registration deadline for the program.


21. I checked my Degree Progress on ALBERT, and it says that I still need to take a course that I know I’ve already taken or a course that I have been told will count towards an Anthropology degree is not listed properly. What can I do?


This is a fairly common occurrence – sometimes one or more courses you have taken will not be incorporated properly into your Degree Progress Report. This sometimes happens because courses can fulfill more than one requirement or because you registered for a cross-listed course through a different department. This will also happen if a CCC class (e.g., a Cultures in Context class) taught by an Anthropology faculty member is used as an elective class or if the Director of Undergraduate Studies and the Undergraduate Curriculum Committee approve an outside course to count towards an Anthropology degree. More mundanely, ALBERT is an imperfect system and not all courses that can be applied to an Anthropology degree are recognized as such.

If you notice an error with your Degree Progress Report, please let either Sam Rolfe, the Undergraduate Administrative Aide, or Shara Bailey, the Director of Undergraduate Studies, know and we can manually check your Degree Progress and write a memo to the Registrar to revise how courses are reflected in your progress report.


22. What is an Independent Study? What does an Independent Study in Anthropology involve and how do I register for one? Can I count an Independent Study towards my major or minor?


An Independent Study is an opportunity for students to work closely with a faculty advisor on a project related to their area of interest. Students must choose a member of the faculty in their area of study with whom they have had at least one Anthropology course. After securing approval from a faculty member in writing, the student should see the Director of Undergraduate Studies to fill out a Petition to Enroll in an Independent Study (which can also be downloaded from the "Forms" page of the departmental website) and register for Independent Study units. On the petition, the student must provide a short description of the proposed course of study and will receive the approval signature of their faculty supervisor. In general, the student and faculty supervisor agree to regular consultations (at least every other week) to review progress, and the grade for the course must be submitted by the supervisor to the Director of Undergraduate Studies by the last day of the term in which the student is registered.

Independent Studies may be taken for 2 or 4 units, depending on the nature of the particular project being pursued. In exceptional cases, Independent Study courses may be taken for 6 or 8 units, pending approval of the Director of Undergraduate Studies.

Independent Study units can be applied towards the major or minor in Anthropology and can fulfill one of the student's elective requirements, provided that the student earns a grade of at least C. A maximum of 8 units of Independent Study can be applied to the 36 units required for the major in Anthropology, and a maximum of 4 units of Independent Study can be applied to the 16 units required for the minor.


23. What is an Internship? What type of Internships can I get Anthropology credit for? How do I apply? Can I count an Internship towards my major or minor?


Internships are opportunities for students to gain practical work experience relevant to anthropology and are sponsored by selected institutions, agencies, and research laboratories. Not all internships opportunities are worthy of academic credit. To receive academic credit, the student must first secure an Anthropology Department professor who will supervise the internship, working in conjunction with the intended internship site. This department supervisor will assign the internship's final grade, with input from internship supervisors. Once this agreement among the student, her/his Anthropology Department supervising professor, and the contact persons at the internship site is finalized, the student will complete a Petition to Enroll in an Internship (which can also be downloaded from the "Forms" page of the departmental website), getting signatures from the Anthropology Department supervising professor, the internship site's supervising personnel, and the Anthropology Department DUGS (Director of Undergraduate Studies). The student will then hand in this form to the Anthropology department Undergraduate Administrative Aide. The Internship sponsor must provide the supervising Anthropology Department faculty with a written account of the activities, responsibilities, and number of hours per week the student will spend on the Internship. In signing the petition, the sponsor must agree to provide a detailed, written evaluation of the student's performance, sent to the supervising Anthropology Department professor and the Director of Undergraduate Studies, by December 15 for fall internships and May 15 for spring internships.

After reviewing these materials, the Director of Undergraduate Studies, in conjunction with the Anthropology Department supervising professor, can approve and register the student for either a 2 credit or a 4 credit Internship, depending on the demands of the position. Typically, 4 to 5 hours of work are required per week for each unit of Internship credit.

Internships unit do not count towards the major and/or minor in Anthropology, but they do count towards the overall number of credits needed for graduation. Please note that the College of Arts of Sciences also has a very specific policy regarding internships that prospective interns should review and adhere to.


24. How do I find out about Internship options and opportunities?


Students usually find out about Internship opportunities through their own research on the internet or through personal contacts. Additionally, when departmental staff and faculty become aware of opportunities that may be of interest to our students, we will send out an email with relevant information to our list of majors and minors and/or post an announcement to the departmental LISTSERV.


25. I'd like to participate in a summer field school. Does the department run any field schools? Can I get credit for participating in a field school?


Students interested in the sub-fields of Biological Anthropology and Archaeological Anthropology sometimes have the opportunity to participate in hands-on field schools, summer field programs, or intercession field programs run by institutions other than NYU. There are a wide variety of these available, both in the US and abroad, and they can vary widely in quality. Additionally, NYU Anthropology faculty occasionally run summer field schools or provide opportunities for select advanced undergraduate students to participate in field research. We encourage you to talk with individual faculty about such opportunities.

Depending on a review of the specifics of the program and the offering institution, the Department may choose - or may not choose - to allow students to receive credit towards the major or minor for participation in a non-NYU field school or summer field program. Students interested in participating in such a program should consult with both the College of Arts and Sciences Advising Center and with the Director of Undergraduate Studies well in advance of the registration deadline for the program. In order to receive credit towards and anthropology degree for a field study program, the College must accept transfer units from the institution running the field program. In addition, students need to complete a Petition for Field Study Credit (which can also be downloaded from the "Forms" page of the departmental website) and provide the Director of Undergraduate Studies with detailed materials about the program's curricular content, which will then be reviewed by appropriate faculty members within the department and the department's Undergraduate Curriculum Committee to see if it is acceptable to count toward the major or minor.


26. How do I find out more about field study programs and opportunities?


Students usually find out about field study opportunities through their own research on the internet or by referral from faculty mentors or other students. When departmental staff and faculty become aware of field study opportunities that may be of interest to our students, we will send out an email with relevant information to our list of majors and minors and/or post an announcement to the departmental LISTSERV.  For archaeologists, the website Shovelbums.org (www.shovelbums.org) is a great resource for information on a variety of field school possibilities. For primatologists, the Danta Association for Conservation in the Tropics (http://danta.info/about/about.php) and the Maderas Rainforest Conservancy (http://www.maderasrfc.org/Maderas_Rainforest_Conservancy/Home.html) both run field schools in Central America that past NYU undergraduates have attended. For paleoanthropologists, Rutgers University runs the Koobi Fora Field School (http://cashp.columbian.gwu.edu/koobi-fora-field-school) in Kenya, which NYU undergraduates have also participated in.



Honors Questions:


27. I am interested in pursuing Departmental Honors in Anthropology. What are the requirements of the Honors Program?


Those majors who meet the requirements for College Honors and who maintain an overall grade point average of 3.65 and an average of 3.65 in the major are eligible to apply for admission to the Departmental Honors Program in Anthropology during their junior year. Honors Program candidates are expected to complete a total of 40 points (typically ten 4-unit classes) of anthropology course work, i.e., four points more than normally required for the major.

The departmental Honors Program consists of, at minimum, a 12-point (three course) experience. First, all students doing honors must undertake a two-term capstone research project, typically during their senior year, under the supervision of a faculty advisor. This project should include sustained original research and culminates in the production of an Honors Thesis. Additionally, Honors Program participants must take at least one Special Seminar in Anthropology (ANTH-UA 800 or ANTH-UA 801 for students pursuing honors research in sociocultural or linguistic anthropology) or a graduate course (for students focusing on archaeological or biological anthropology for their honors research) during the course of their undergraduate career.

Students interested in applying to the Honors Program must first secure the support of a faculty supervisor from within the department who agrees to work closely with the student in developing their honors project and who will mentor the student's progress through the Honors Program. This faculty member will serve as the primary reader of the student's honors thesis. Students in consultation with their faculty supervisor also choose a second member from the Department of Anthropology or from a relevant, related department, to serve as a second reader of the Honors Thesis.

To support their capstone research experience, Honors Program students must complete the Department's two-semester research/thesis writing sequence, typically during the senior year. In the Fall semester, all honors candidates from across departmental sub-fields will enroll in Honors Research I (ANTH-UA 950), in which research methods will be reviewed and individualized to fit the student's topic – e.g., assembling a bibliography; constructing hypotheses; using secondary, primary and occasionally original sources to generate data; and analyzing data. In the Spring semester, all thesis writers will enroll in Honors Research II (ANTH-UA 951) to share their evolving theses with the group. In both semesters, it is the responsibility of the thesis writer to consult regularly with their faculty supervisor.


28. How and when do I apply for admission to the Departmental Honors Program in Anthropology?


To apply for admission to the Honors Program, the student and their Honors faculty supervisor need to complete and turn in to the Director of Undergraduate Studies a completed copy of the Petition to Enroll in the Honors Program one full year in advance of when the student plans to graduate. Typically, this deadline would be by the end of the Spring semester of the junior year.

Under exceptional circumstances (e.g., if a student plans to graduate mid-year or plans on being abroad during the Fall semester of the senior year), it may be possible for a student to pursue Honors under a slightly different schedule. In these cases, however, the student, their faculty supervisor, and the Director of Undergraduate Studies must negotiate an acceptable alternative plan. A completed copy of the Petition to Enroll in the Honors Program must still be turned in at least one full year in advance of when the student plans to graduate.


29. When are Honors theses due? How long are Honors theses? Are there any special formatting requirements?


A draft of the entire Honors Thesis must be completed by three weeks prior to the end of the semester in which the student graduates in order to give the two thesis readers sufficient time to comment on the thesis so revisions can be made. The scope and length of an Honor's Thesis will vary by sub-field, but will typically be 40 to 60 double-spaced pages in length.

Theses must be prepared in a standard typeface (Arial, Helvetica, Times, or Times New Roman) and double-spaced with 1" margins throughout. More specific formatting is at the discretion of the thesis supervisor.


30. What do I need to turn in to fulfill the thesis requirement of the Honors program?

To fulfill the thesis requirement of participation in the Honors Program, you need to have TWO hard copies of the Title Page of your thesis signed by both of your thesis readers (a sample Title Page can be downloaded from the "Forms" page of the departmental website). You must turn in these signed title pages, two hard copies of the final thesis, and a PDF version of the final thesis that includes a scan of the signed title page to the Director of Undergraduate Studies by the last class day of the semester in which you are graduating.


31. Are there any other requirements for dissemination of my research results?


Honors candidates are strongly encouraged to formally present posters/papers at the annual Dean’s Undergraduate Research Conference and within the department.


32. I am completing a double or dual major and would like to do Honors. What does that entail?


Students with double majors in discrete, unrelated disciplines must complete Honors Programs in each major for which they seek honors. Students with double majors in interdisciplinary or related fields may, if the two departments concur, convene a joint honors committee to establish an interdisciplinary research program of coursework that culminates in a single thesis. In the case of joint majors, faculty supervisors and the Directors of Undergraduate Studies from both relevant departments must work out an agreement on the requirements for honors and on the supervision and evaluation of students' theses or projects. This should be done well in advance of the end of the Spring semester of the junior year.


Registration Questions:


33. How do I get cleared for registration?


During the pre-registration advising period, Anthropology majors (and minors, if they so desire) should make an appointment to meet with the Director of Undergraduate Studies to review progress towards their degree and discuss scheduling options for the upcoming semester. Announcement of dates and times available for registration appointments will be emailed to declared majors and posted in the Anthropology department main office. Students are generally cleared to register within 24 hours of their advising appointments, and sooner if possible. Still, students should make sure to sign up for an advising appointment well in advance of their registration time to be assured of being cleared to register by the time their allotted registration time rolls around.

Anthropology minors and students from schools other than the College of Arts and Sciences must be cleared to register through their major department.

Students who newly declare an Anthropology majors in the weeks just prior to registration are welcome to visit the Director of Undergraduate Studies in Anthropology for pre-registration advice, but may also want to visit their College of Arts and Sciences advisor in the CAS Advising Center (Silver Building, 9th floor) to be assured that they are properly cleared to register as it takes some time for new major declarations to be entered into the ALBERT system.


34. I’m studying abroad next semester. Do I still need to meet with an advisor for pre-registration advising?


Yes, for several reasons. First, you will still need to be cleared to register if you will be attending an NYU Abroad program. Second, it is in your best interest to meet with Director of Undergraduate Studies to ensure that you are on track for your Anthropology major or minor and to discuss possibilities for completing Anthropology electives while abroad.


35. If I am currently abroad, how do I get cleared for registration?


Anthropology majors currently studying abroad should contact the Director of Undergraduate Studies as soon as they receive departmental correspondence advising of the upcoming pre-registration period and should be proactive about making such contact in case they miss that advisory. Students abroad should send the Director of Undergraduate Studies a copy of their current transcript and a list of potential classes for the upcoming semester, which we will review to ensure you are on track to complete your degree. We will advise you of any issues and then clear you to register on ALBERT in accordance with your Registration Appointment scheduled by the Registrar.


36. I’m a double major. Do I need to be cleared through both departments?


No. If both of your major departments are in the College of Arts and Sciences, you may be cleared through either department. However, we would still recommend that you meet with the Director of Undergraduate Studies in Anthropology during the pre-registration advising period to ensure that you are on track to complete your Anthropology major.