This Semester's Courses

For the most up to date course information (especially regarding room assignments) please use the Albert course search function.
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Departmental Courses

Human Society and Culture
ANTH-­UA 1
Rademacher
Surveys the general aims, methods, and findings of modern cultural anthropology and its ties with the humanities and social sciences. Economic, political, and family organizations and systems of thought, including religion, are covered with equal attention to "primitive," traditional, and modern complex societies, particularly non-­Western societies.

Human Evolution
ANTH­-UA 2
Williams
Investigates the evolutionary origins of humans. The study of human evolution is a multidisciplinary endeavor involving a synthesis of concepts, techniques, and research findings from a variety of different scientific fields, including evolutionary biology, paleontology, primatology, comparative anatomy, genetics, molecular biology, geology, and archaeology. Explores the different contributions that scientists have made toward understanding human origins and provides a detailed survey of the evidence used to reconstruct the evolutionary history of our own species.

Archaeology: Early Societies and Cultures
ANTH-­UA 3
Wright
Introduces contemporary archaeology, its theories, practices, and early societies and cultures. Examines current methodological and theoretical viewpoints of archaeological scholarship within the discipline of anthropology. Focuses on key transformations in cultural evolution, such as the origins of modern humans, the emergence of food production, and the development of complex societies, urbanism, and early states. Explores gender roles, landscapes and settlements, technologies, art, cognitive systems, urbanism, and state formation.

Anthropology of Language
ANTH-UA 17
Das
Taking an anthropological perspective on the role of language in contemporary social life, introduces students to theories and methods for studying communicative practices across a range of societies and settings. Ethnographic studies focus on the role of language in regulating social relations, identity formation, power and politics, verbal art and performance, literacy and education in multilingual and multicultural settings, and the development of new media.

Medical Anthropology
ANTH-UA 35
Rapp
Analyzes cultural practices and belief systems surrounding illness, suffering, and healing in medical systems around the globe. Healing specialists may be trained in both indigenous and cosmopolitan medicine; patients and healers both confront the structures of health resources and problems of improving health care.

Cultural Symbols
ANTH-UA 48
Myers
Surveys the various symbolic systems employed by the world’s people, considering their use in myth, ritual, literature, and art and the kinds of anthropological theories applied to explain their power and forms. Approaches theory through case studies, providing a diverse view of world cultures. Uses materials from all continents; emphasizes non- Western, nonliterate societies, though some material from the West is also used.

Human Variation
ANTH-UA 51
Disotell
Humans are the most wide-ranging of all of the species on earth. Our evolutionary history and our ability to adapt to such a broad range of environments result in the patterns of human variability we see today. New techniques have been developed that allow us to explore the different levels of human variation. Focuses on new data and methodologies, including molecular genetic techniques, and the hypotheses and controversies generated by these new perspectives.

Primate Behavioral Ecology
ANTH-UA 54
Higham
Studies the evolution of primate behavior and primate social and mating systems. How and why primates have evolved to be so social and varied in their social and mating systems, and why they exhibit so many unusual characteristics. Topics considered: primate biology and taxonomy, evolutionary theory and the history and philosophy of primate studies, natural selection and social systems, sexual selection and mating systems, and intelligence and communication.

Prehistoric Art and Symbolic Evolution
ANTH-UA 212
White
Examines prehistoric art forms, their interpretation, and their evolutionary and behavioral significance. Introduction to Stone Age art—its form, contents, and chronological evolution. Also employs more recent prehistoric case studies. Reviews and assesses competing interpretive frameworks, with emphasis on understanding the social and ideological context within which the art was produced and comprehended.

TS: Anthropology of Museums
ANTH-UA 320.1
Anderson
TBA

TS: The Sociology of Islam
ANTH-UA 320.2
Gilsenan
TBA

TS: Anthropology of Climate Change
ANTH-UA 320.3
Whitington
TBA

TSII: Science, Technology, and the Environment
ANTH 321.1
Whitington
TBA