Special Programs

In addition to the degree and certificate programs below, this page lists a variety of research centers and working groups in which the department’s faculty and students are currently active.
  • Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies

    The Anthropology Department is actively connected with the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies (CLACS) of the Graduate School of Arts and Science. CLACS brings together University faculty specializing in Latin American and Caribbean research. Anthropology faculty members offer courses and guidance to students in this program, and anthropology students may construct special programs of study and research that utilize the resources offered by CLACS. The Center participates in a consortium with the Institute for Latin American Studies at Columbia University that sponsors joint courses and conferences that New York University students may attend. Additional resources are available through faculty and graduate student collaboration with the programs of the King Juan Carlos I of Spain Center for the study of Spain and the Spanish-speaking world. Read more...

  • Center for Media Culture and History

    This interdisciplinary Center, founded in 1993 by Director Faye Ginsburg with support from The Rockefeller and Ford Foundations, sponsors a rich slate of public programming each semester with screenings, lectures and conferences, that integrate concerns of faculty and students from across the university and with cultural institutions in the city such as the Museum of Modern Art, the National Museum of the American Indian, and the American Museum of Natural History. The Center addresses issues of representation, social change, materiality and identity construction embedded in the development of film, television, video, and new media worldwide. Read more...

  • Center for Religion and Media

    Faculty members Faye Ginsburg (Culture and Media) and Angela Zito (Religious Studies/ Anthropology) co-direct the interdisciplinary Center for Religion and Media, funded by The Pew Charitable Trusts as part of their Centers of Excellence Program for 2003-2008. The Center, a joint project of the Religious Studies Program and the Center for Media, Culture, and History, develops and broadens interdisciplinary and cross-cultural scholarship, pedagogy, and public knowledge of religion and media as a global phenomena with deep local roots. Read more...

  • Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality

    The Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality (CSGS) facilitates a broad interdisciplinary investigation of gender and sexuality as keys to understanding human experience. CSGS's main activity is to organize events, including seminars, panel discussions, film screenings, and conferences. These events provide a vital meeting-place where scholars, students, artists, and activists can discuss issues involving gender and sexuality, and their intersections with other social phenomena such as race, religion, nation, class, ability/disability and ethnicity. Studies, published by Duke University Press. Read more...

  • Center for the Study of Human Origins

    The Center for the Study of Human Origins (CSHO) was inaugurated in 2002. Its mission is to enhance and facilitate research on all fields of biological anthropology and archaeology that are broadly related to the study of human origins and evolution from a biological and cultural perspective. The aim is to foster and support multidisciplinary investigations, with an emphasis on the development of collaborative projects, international fieldwork, and state-of-the-art laboratory research. Faculty members associated with the Center currently work on aspects of primate and human paleontology, skeletal biology and comparative anatomy, molecular primatology, primate socioecology and conservation, behavioral endocrinology, Paleolithic archaeology, zooarchaeology, and the origins of symbolism, complex societies, and cities and states. In addition to research, the Center also aims to promote a greater understanding and appreciation of the study of human origins among the academic community and the public at large through conferences, workshops, educational programs, and outreach activities. Read more...

  • Program in Culture and Media

    The Departments of Anthropology and Cinema Studies offer a specialized joint course of study leading to a New York State Certificate in Culture and Media for NYU graduate students who are pursuing their M.A. or Ph.D. degrees in Anthropology, Cinema Studies, or Comparative Literature. The program’s philosophy takes a broad approach to the relationships between culture and media in a number of domains including: ethnographic film’s significance for the fields of anthropology and cinema/media studies; problems in representation of cultures through media; the development of media in indigenous, diaspora, and non-Western communities; the emerging social and cultural formations shaped by new media practices; and the political economy shaping the production, distribution and consumption of media worldwide.

    The program’s philosophy takes a broad approach to the relationships between culture and media in a number of domains including: ethnographic film’s significance for the fields of anthropology and cinema/media studies; problems in representation of cultures through media; the development of media in indigenous, Diaspora, and non-Western communities; the emerging social and cultural formations shaped by new media practices; and the political economy shaping the production, distribution and consumption of media worldwide. Read more...

  • Institute for Law and Society

    As an interschool program, supported by New York University 's School of Law and the Faculty of Arts and Science, the law and society program serves as an intellectual center for faculty, graduate students, and law students interested in studying law and legal institutions from an interdisciplinary social science perspective. Law and Society encourages a wide range of social science perspectives, theoretical frameworks, and empirical methods. In addition to formal course work, the program convenes the NYU law and society colloquium and the law and society workshop, sponsors sociolegal conferences, and hosts visiting scholars Read more...

  • Kevorkian Center for Near Eastern Studies

    The Hagop Kevorkian Center for Near Eastern Studies was created in 1966 to foster the interdisciplinary study of the modern and contemporary Middle East and to enhance public understanding of the region. The Kevorkian Center's activities focus on the histories, politics, economies, religions, cultures and languages of the area stretching from North Africa to Central Asia, and on the historical processes that have shaped the present. The Kevorkian Center organizes research workshops, luncheon seminars and other forums to encourage new perspectives on the Middle East and foster exploration of interactions and parallels with other world regions. Read more...

  • M.A. in Human Skeletal Biology

    This two year program prepares graduates to apply the principles and techniques of skeletal biology and genetic research in Physical Anthropology to a variety of contexts, including those in the Forensic Sciences (i.e., Medical Examiner’s office, Coroner’s office, Armed Forces, Criminal Justice, Law Enforcement, Mass Disasters). The program can also be useful training for students who are preparing for admission to doctoral programs in skeletal biology and human evolution. Program includes 36 points of coursework, a laboratory or field internship, and a research-based M.A. thesis. Read more...

  • Museum Studies

    Museum Studies. For more than thirty years, the Program in Museum Studies at New York University has offered an innovative course of study in the contemporary theory and practice of museum work. Emphasizing both the interdisciplinary study of museums and courses of practical training, the program has prepared more than three hundred graduates for positions of increasing responsibility in museums throughout the world. Our graduates are working in museums of fine art, history, anthropology, technology, and natural history; in arboretums, national parks, and science centers; with private and corporate collections; and in government agencies, historical societies, and art galleries. And their careers cover the full range of museum activity, working as directors, curators, educators, registrars, collection managers, and development, media and public relations specialists. Read more...

  • The NYCEP Program

    New York University participates in the New York Consortium for Evolutionary Primatology (NYCEP), a graduate training program in evolutionary primatology that includes New York University, City University of New York, Columbia University, Wildlife Conservation Society at the Bronx Zoo, and the American Museum of Natural History. The consortium provides an integrated training program that allows student to take courses, seminars, and internships at any of these institutions offered by more than thirty biological anthropologists, primatologists, and vertebrae paleontologists participating in the program. Read more...

  • Psyences Project

    This project is a regional seminar for scholars and clinicians in the “Psy” disciplines launched by Elizabeth Lunbeck (History of Science, Harvard University), Emily Martin (Anthropology, NYU), and Louis Sass (Clinical Psychology, Rutgers), that meets for discussion with an invited speaker 2-4 times per year. It has a listserv of about 200 people, which anyone interested is welcome to join. It has been funded by NYU, Princeton, and Vanderbilt University. During 2010- 2011 it was supported by a grant from NYU’s Humanities Institute and in 2013-15 by a grant from the NSF Program in Cultural Anthropology. Among the speakers for the coming 2015-16 academic year will be Sahar Sadjadi from Amherst College and Victoria Pitts from Wesleyan University. To join send email to subscribe-the-psyence-project@lists.nyu.edu Read more...